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tv   ABC World News Now  ABC  September 22, 2011 2:05am-4:00am PDT

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be singing on the big again. -- [ unintelligible ] gwinnett just won an emmy for playing an edgey substitute teacher on "glee." >> kobe bryant has been offered $800,000 a game to play for an italian team during the nba lockout. it would include three home games. bryan makes roughly $300,000 per game in the nba. he has turned down an offer from turkey. he may consider italy, since he grew up there while his father pro ball for an italian team. >> that's a cool connection. >> i'm going to have off time. does anybody want to pay me $800,000? >> a girl can dream. >> we are going to have an interview that i did with jonah hill coming up. that's it for this wednesday afternoon. thank you michael finney for
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joining me. >> thanks for having me. [ applause ] , really. so, very happy. >> reporter: this is eye eileen frere for abc news. >> disturbing story. in other news this morning, federal aviation officials are looking into the crash of a small plane near lake tahoe that
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came down in an aircraft parking area and then burst into flames just after leaving the ground. the pilot was the only person on board. he was brought to a hospital in reno, nevada, with serious injuries. luckily, though, he escaped the plane before it caught fire. the united states should be in the clear as that six-ton satellite races closer to earth. the old research satellite is expected to crash down some time tomorrow afternoon. nasa says it will not pass over north america. but it's too early to tell precisely when and where it will hit. the satellite is expected to break up with some two dozen pieces reaching earth. they could be scattered over a 500-mile area. the nationwide listeria outbreak linked to cantaloupes is now being blamed for killing at least eight people. health officials say now 55 people in 14 states have been sickened. one of the latest victims is a 48-year-old colorado woman who died a month after eating contaminated cantaloupe. at least two lawsuits now have been filed against jensen farms, the suspected source of the deadly bacteria. so, do you like the facebook
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changes you have no doubt seen by now -- >> no, no. >> -- on your home page? >> no. >> plenty of the site's 750 million users do not and they are letting the company know about it. more facebook changes are expected to be announced today at a conference in san francisco. all the new stuff caused such a stir yesterday, the words "new facebook" were one of the most discussed topics on twitter. so, what do you think? you're not a fan, right, rob? >> no. i'm not. i'm a facebook addict. i went on yesterday morning after the show and this whole thing had changed. and they do this bizarre cnn news feed thing and then top story and -- >> too distracting. too much going on. >> and how are you determining what i would think a top story would be? what's the math they do to calculate -- seemed unnecessary. like, why are you doing this? >> it's still huge business, though. it's expected to bring in nearly $4 billion in worldwide advertising this year. it's projected to bring in almost 6 billion bucks next year. they've got to be doing something right. >> i still believe some of the changes they do, particularly ones they don't announce, have
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to be linked to the huge marketability of the site and what it means for those dollars. that's what i think, too. that's just a theory. chime in on facebook. this has a lot of buzz. if you can find it. >> right. >> logon and let us know. wnnfans.com. i don't like it, man. too much -- i'm getting old. i don't like all this change. >> tone it down, keep it simpler, cleaner. >> please. here's your thursday forecast now. >> we're the experts. >> yes. a soaker for much of the east from maine down to new york, charlotte and atlanta. showers from little rock to dallas. possibly austin and waco. wet and windy in the pacific northwest from seattle to olympia, washington. >> 81 in portland. 77 in salt lake city. 84 in billings. dallas gets up to 81. kansas city, 71. detroit, 70. 70s in boston and new york. 80 in atlanta. near 90 in miami. well, pope benedict returns to his home country of germany today for a four-day visit. and they are making a unique, if
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not pricy, souvenir. >> check out the papal bears being turned out by one toymaker. of course, he's completely dressed in pope-like attire. >> only making just over 100 of them. the price tag, $315. >> bears. bears were also made when benedict became pope and for his first visit to germany as pope in 2006 and for his 80th birthday. i wonder if there's a significance to the bear? >> i don't quite get it. cute and papal bear. whatever makes you float, folks. >> we'll be back with more "world news now." ♪ your little teddy bear ♪ put a chain around my neck and leave me ♪
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welcome back, everybody. we turn now to some medical news this morning. the critical connection between having cancer and dying of a heart attack. that's exactly what happened to kara kennedy, the daughter of late senator ted kennedy. >> so what can cancer survivors learn from her death? here's abc news medical editor dr. richard besser. >> reporter: kara kennedy, the picture of an active cancer survivor. 51 years old, mother of two, film maker and tv producer. she had been healthy for nine years after surviving surgery, chemotherapy and radiation for her lung cancer. then at her gym last week, as she did her regular exercise, her family said her heart gave out. perhaps because of the very cancer treatments that saved her. it's a growing concern for cancer survivors and their doctors who realize cancer isn't just a heartache, it may lead to a heart problem. beating back cancer cells with toxic chemicals takes a toll on
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the healthy cells as well. when radiation is targeted at the breast or lung, especially on the left side of the body, the heart can be accidentally damaged. even more importantly, some chemotherapies can weaken the heart. such a concern it's given rise to a new field, cardioncology. cardiology that pays special attention to these at-risk cancer survivors. those doctors recommend a cardiac stress test or a heart ultrasound to check for damage, whether it's a week or 20 years after the cancer is beaten. >> we're encouraging our patients to continue to watch their diet, go for low fat, low carbohydrate, moderate protein diet and exercise. >> reporter: 51 is too young to die, but kara kennedy's death may be a wake-up call for others. as more survive cancer, doctors are working to make sure patients survive cancer treatments longer than ever. there is good news. specialized equipment radiologists use to try to target the cancer and avoid the heart all together. drugs are monitored more closely to make sure they're not
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affecting the heart muscle. dr. richard besser, abc news, new york. >> what a scary link. she was diagnosed with lung cancer back in 2002 and was told it was inoperable. but then, with the help of ted kennedy, found a doctor to remove part of her lung and she made it. >> she was laid to rest wednesday. the family is still in mourning. >> 51 years old. young, young. we will lighten the mood a little bit when we come back. stay tuned for your "skinny."
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♪ it's the end of the world as we know it ♪ ♪ it's the end of the world as we know it ♪ and i feel fine ♪ >> appropriate song, indeed. >> indeed. it is the end of the world as we know it. a lot of folks are going to shed a tear over this one. r.e.m. is splitting up, calling it quits. it's over. calling it a day. they each have something to say about it but i think one of the most appropriate statements was made by michael stipe, lead singer. he said a wise man once said the skill in attending a party is
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knowing when it's time to leave. >> well said. >> they said they built something extraordinary together. we did this thing and now we're going to walk away from it. we hope our fans know this wasn't an easy decision but all things have to end and we wanted to do it our way. >> after 31 years. >> no animosity. they're done. over three decades released 15 albums. classics like "murmur,"" reckoning,". they have plans to release a careers span and greatest hits collection later this year. look out for that. it will have new music on it as well. >> they did their thing. they were a huge success. now they wanted to do something different. they did a lot of good stuff. >> they had their time in the sun and they're going to take a little break. >> losing their religion. well, this is an interesting story here, abc has a new show coming out "charlie's angels" which one of the stars is minka kelly, who is best known probably right now, the exgirlfriend of derek jeter.
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apparently there was a situation on the set where a crew member slapped her on the backside and she kind of yelled at him and said, please don't ever disrespect me or any other woman like that again. and because abc has a zero tolerance policy on sexual harassment the guy was banned from the set. he has been fired. she apparently was friendly with the guy and didn't want him fired. >> she didn't complain. someone else saw the incident happening and reported it. >> apparently the kicker is the guy had done this before. i will tell the guy this, bad form, but great taste. >> all right, moving on. moving on. new allegations emerge surrounding lance armstrong and whether or not he used the juice. we have to say lance armstrong has never been tested positive and he denies any use but new reports coming out of an italian newspaper saying that he made payments to an italian physician who had been banned for doping through a company in switzerland. in other words, he used this company in switzerland as a front to make payments to this doctor who italian authorities say earlier this year they suspect him of continuing to work with 20 to 30 top-level
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cyclists despite the ban, this doctor was banned. again, you know, lance armstrong denies all of these allegations. but it's an interesting new report. >> tough to hear about such a great athlete. "modern family," season premiere last night. huge fan of it. of course, you remember, the two adorable little girls who played lily, twins in real life, jade and ella hiller but apparently they didn't like acting, just wanted to be little girls so they replaced her with a new little girl who will have lines. an adorable little girl. >> look how cute she is.
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here are some stories to watch today on abc news. the protesters who have been expressing their anger with wall street since saturday say their demonstrations will continue today and indefinitely. police have arrested at least seven people during the demonstrations.
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president obama is spending part of the day in the key political state of ohio. he's promoting his jobs plan and visiting a bridge he says will be repaired if the gop backs his proposal. julian assange's long-awaited autobiography goes on sale today. but the wikileaks founder says he's not happy about it. it's the result of a strained relationship between assange and his publisher. >> hope the publisher didn't leak it. finally this half hour is our -- ready? nicely done today, guys. favorite story of the day. today's story involves two of my favorite things -- animals and my spiritual mecca, las vegas. one of my favorites. >> that's right. this is the story of a sin city family reunited with their missing dog after 11 years. heather klein has the story. >> reporter: his name is duncan, an adorable corgi who's quite the escape artist. >> cried and cried. >> reporter: michelle and kent
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bought duncan for their two boys 11 years ago. he became their shadow and companion. >> one day he was gone. just disappeared. >> reporter: she searched in shelters and put up flyers, but never heard anything about his whereabouts until just a few days ago. >> i got a call from this lady from missouri. she says, i have your dog. i'm like, what dog? >> reporter: the lady had duncan. he explains duncan ended up in a valley shelter, where he was adopted. >> she was an elderly lady and the dog ended up being her companion for about ten years. >> reporter: then she passed away and her daughter brought duncan to missouri, where he escaped her house. he was picked up by another rescue group that had discovered duncan had a microchip all along. >> i never would have thought it. not in a million years. but, you know, life is strange. you never know what's going to
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happen. >> reporter: one big adventure for one little dog. he certainly seems happy in his new old home. >> all right. you may not realize this but some of those microchips are set to work for about 25 years. >> really? programmed that long? >> yes. and listen to this. this is how they work. each microchip contains a registration number and phone numberstry particular brand of a cp an radio frequency of the chip and displace thc
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this morning on "world news now" -- defiant until death. troy davis, who was executed late last night in georgia, insisted until the very end he was not the killer. >> the last minute appeal to the u.s. supreme court prolonged the legal drama that is sure to go down in history.
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it's thursday, september 22nd. >> announcer: from abc news, this is "world news now." and good morning, everybody. i'm rob nelson. >> i'm tanya rivero. moments before troy davis was put to death, he told relatives of the policeman he was convicted of killing he did not do it. you will see why this case has captured the attention of protesters worldwide. another big story this morning, american hikers shane bauer and josh fattal are freed from an iranian prison and on their way home. you'll see the emotional moment as they're welcomed into their loved ones' arms. what a great and long-awaited scene last night. >> it's hard to hold back the tears seeing that emotion. >> so happy for them. later this half hour, the texas hairdresser demanding an apology from the tsa. she says she was singled out and considered a security risk at the atlanta airport because of her unusual hair style. >> should the tsa be able to go through your fro?
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that's the essential question in that story. >> i think the fro is coming back. >> we'll see. all right. before that, the state of georgia did carry out troy davis' death sentence late last night after the supreme court refused his last-minute appeal. >> the execution sparked protests around the world and rekindled the emotional debate over capital punishment. abc's john hendren joins us with the details. >> reporter: good morning, rob and tanya. it was a somber night for a man in georgia put to death despite lingering questions over his guilt. troy davis went to his death still calling himself an innocent man. that would not be unusual except that 7 of the 9 witnesses who helped convict him agreed. all seven say he was not the man who gunned down off-duty police officer mark macphail in 1989. six of them say police threatened them if they did not identify davis. supporters who note there was no physical evidence linking davis to the murder called for a last-minute reprieve. those hopes were dimmed on
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tuesday when the georgia pardons and parole board rejected his clemency bid. then the u.s. supreme court also allowed the date to pass without granting a stay. >> i have been through hell. especially the last couple years, when everything was kind of building up and we had to go to court again and again. so, i need some peace. >> reporter: davis is the latest in a series of executions some of which have raised serious questions. lawrence russell brewer was also executed for dragging a black man behind his truck. then cleve foster in alabama and duane buck in texas, both spared execution in the past week when the supreme court stepped in. for davis, the campaign ran into the final hours. davis had high profile list of supporters, including big boi of the group outkast. and quest love of the roots. also, backing his clemency request were former president jimmy carter and the pope. >> it's hard to believe that many witnesses came forward and
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said, look, police coerced us into saying this guy did it. how someone would not have said, let's put on the brakes -- see if we can do something. hard to believe. >> it's hard to believe there wasn't enough doubt there that you wouldn't want to go forward until you were 100% certain. >> to take someone's life. we asked the white house to chime in. they said they didn't want to make a comment. this is a state's issue. we're going to leave it at that. >> a lot of outspoken celebrities have taken to twitter about this case. celebrities have taken to twitter about this case. a lo peore t death penaltyte i forure.it age & in related news as john hendren reported just a second ago, texas also carried out a death sentence last night. but there was no last-minute appeal for lawrence brewer. he was a white supremacist who was convicted in a notorious hate crime. you probably remember this story. he dragged a black man, james byrd, to his death behind a pickup truck. that crime took place 13 years
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ago. the day before his execution, brewer actually told a tv interviewer that he had no regrets and actually would do it all over again. >> chilling. but it is a joyful day for shane bauer and jpthtast after two years in ania one month after being convicted of espionage, they boarded a plane and flew to oman. abc's jim sciutto was there. >> reporter: their long, gruelling imprisonment in iran ended as a royal omani air force jet touched down. their families rushing right up to the plane to meet them. until josh fattal and shane bauer bounded down the steps into their arms. smiles, tears and a long kiss between shane and sarah shourd, his fiancee and fellow prisoner until one year ago this week. >> we are so happy we are free and so relieved we are free. >> two years in prison is too long. >> reporter: too long for the families as well. >> and he lasted 781 days. we couldn't be more proud. >> and you lasted 781 days.
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>> and so did shane. >> reporter: 781 days in iran's most notorious prison, one month on hunger strike, protesting their detention. a total of just 15 minutes in phone calls home. and just one face-to-face visit in iran. $1 million in bail. as their detention dragged on, their families' patience and strength wore thin. >> there must be moments when you just feel that resolve or the energy weakening. >> i don't ever feel resolve. that's never. but there are days. i don't sleep. i don't sleep at night. >> reporter: jim sciutto, abc news. >> you could feel the love in that image, can you not? those guys getting off the plane, incredible. >> so exciting. absolutely. >> you wonder if the release will have that humanitarian gesture that president ahmadinejad wanted it to have in terms of u.s./iranian relations? we'll see how it plays out. but they're home. that's the bottom line. >> absolutely. more middle eastern news.
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there could be a showdown at united nations tomorrow when the palestinians are expected to ask for statehood. president obama has failed to talk them out of it. in his address at the u.n. yesterday, he argued only direct negotiations with israel can achieve that end. the united nations -- the united states will veto the palestinian bid while working behind the scenes for an alternative. now to a big question on capitol hill. how much would you pay for a muffin? well, believe it or not, you're already paying 16 bucks. that's not the only grossly overpriced item the government is snapping up at the expense of taxpayers. more on this from abc's jon karl. >> reporter: yes, it's true. the justice department has found a way to spend 16 bucks for a single muffin. 10 bucks on a cookie. $8.24 on a cup of coffee. all part of the $121 million this one government department spent on conferences in just 24 months. $16 muffins, really? does washington get it?
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>> that's insane. i think that's -- again, that is why people across this country are so frustrated. >> reporter: nobody can tell us how an ordinary muffin like this could cost $16. but this is just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to the ways that washington wastes your money. look at herman the hermit crab or rex the mountain lion. the department of homeland security has developed several mascots to teach kids how to prepare for disasters. cut back to just one mascot and by one estimate you save $2.6 million on production and program costs. highway funds are still going for all kinds of things that don't have much to do with highways at all. like the $269,000 white squirrel sanctuary in tennessee. the nearly $200,000 for a theater at the corvette museum in kentucky. and just look at the fancy posters congress gets printed up for speeches. we've been asking for two years how much they cost and still
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don't have an answer. the $16 muffin prompted vice president biden to announce he's going to convene a cabinet meeting later this year, asking every federal agency what they're doing to save money. jonathan karl, abc news, washington. >> kinko's should give congress a proposal on printing up poster board for them. >> come on. it's crazy. that to me -- a story like that is perfect fodder for those saying, you want to raise taxes on us yet you're wasting the money you already do have? how can you argue against that? $16 muffin? >> i hope it was tasty muffin. >> it would have to be. better be a gold nugget in that muffin. i don't get it. moving on. there are plenty of questions and few answers about a car bombing in michigan injured a father and his two sons on tuesday evening. they remain hospitalized in serious condition. authorities are searching for clues about how the bomb was made and who might have planted it. suburban milwaukee, a couple
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of guys are denying they are heroes after saving a man's life. police dash cam video shows the scene as cpr was being performed on a bus driver who lost consciousness while behind the wheel. the business partners saw the bus go through a stop. that's when they knew something was wrong so they took action. >> we were wondering, what is the bus doing? why isn't it stopping? then we're like, there's no bus driver. >> braked and slowed down the bus and stopped it, threw it in park, checked for a pulse. >> incredible. they started cpr until an ambulance crew arrived. the victim was revived. the two special needs children on the bus weren't hurt. thankfully. wow. >> good samaritans. >> could have ended in tragedy. >> no kidding, wow. here's a look now at your thursday weather. rain along the eastern third from new england down to florida with the heaviest rain around d.c., philly and the big apple. showers in dallas, oklahoma city and little rock, windy with showers in seattle and olympia and it's feeling a lot like fall
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across the midwest. >> 55 in the twin cities. 60 in chicago. 65 in omaha. boston gets up to 72. atlanta, 80. new orleans, 87. a wet 75 in seattle. 85 in boise. 77 in albuquerque. well, there is something of a big bug battle just beginning right now in the state of minnesota. >> that's right. state officials are releasing stingless wasps. stingless being the key word. stingless wasps in areas where emerald ash beetles are already killing trees. they want nature to take its course. when it does, they believe those beetles will be neutralized. >> the hope is that thousands of trees can actually be saved from beetle infestation. only thing is, they won't really know if it all works for about five years. stay tuned to "world news now." we'll update then in 2016. >> that's right. wasps bettergles
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wasped hem.rgles >> nothem . y w nothem . ♪ imma be, imma be, imma imma imma be ♪ ♪ imma be, imma be, imma imma imma be ♪ ♪ imma be, imma be, imma imma imma be ♪ ♪ imma be imma be the statue of liberty? the grand canyon? it's all possible ith a hoveround., tom: hi i'm tom kruse, inventor rand founder of hoveround., when we say you're free to see the world, we mean it. call today and get a free overound information kit, that includes a video and full color brochure. dennis celorie: "it's by far the best chair i've ever owned." terri: "last year, 9 out of 10 people got their hoveround for "little or no money." jim plunkitt: "no cost. absolutely no cost to me." breaking news...when you call today, we'll include a free hoveround collapsible grabber with the purchase of your power chair. it reaches, it grabs, it's collapsible and it's portable. it goes wherever you go. get it free while supplies last. call the number on your screen to get your free video, brochure
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♪ long beautiful hair ♪ shining gleaming ♪ give me tons of hair hair >> yeah. >> yes, indeed. >> i love this story. i'm loving this story. >> i think it predicts a comeback, is what i'm hoping for. i think it's a sexy look. >> yeah. >> security at airports is extremely tight. for good reason. sometimes you see the tsa searching somebody that just makes you scratch your head. >> in this case, scratch your afro. you see, a hairstylist was recently embarrassed when the
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tsa agents insisted they search her hair. >> i'm trying to figure out am i going to stop the nightmares, am i going to stop dreaming about the incident? >> reporter: hairdresser brantley has flown dozens of times. security at atlanta's hartsfield jackson airport monday as usual. it was after she left the checkpoint waiting on a train platform that brantley says the tsa made a shocking request. >> we have to check your hair for explosives. i thought they were kidding. i said, you can't check my hair. i just left the checkpoint and security and they didn't pull me to the side. >> reporter: isis brantley says she was in tears by the time the patdown was over. >> so, she's all in my hair, checking my hair. i just asked her to hurry. it was humiliating. it was very, like, disrespectful. and i was very distraught. i thought, you know, how could you do this in front of everybody? >> reporter: she says she was not offered a private screening. that's something the tsa disputes. in a statement issued, agency
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officials say tsa screening procedures are designed to ensure the security of the traveling public. additional screening may be required for clothing, headwear or hair, where prohibited items could be hidden. this passenger left the checkpoint prior to the completion of the screening process and was offered but refused private screening. brantley says she feels she was a victim of racial profiling. >> i would love it if tsa could make a public apology to me and let me know that i'm safe to travel and they will follow their procedures. >> i'm upset somebody would treat diana ross like that. >> i know. in case you're wondering how to get that hair. she has not cut her hair since she was 12 and she's now 35. >> wow, all those years. >> that's what you need to do. >> that's kind of -- i mean, security's security, but she does have a lot of hair, you know. >> it looks good. it frames the face. >> frames the face, really? you said you would want -- i'm impressed. rings in the fro? >> i would like to rock that. i need a big perm. why not?
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>> i think you look good. i think you look good. >> what about you, rob? >> maybe. maybe one day. i'm trying to keep what i have left. >> we have a graphic of you with a fro somewhere. >> i'm surprised they didn't show that. >> pull it out. graphics, what's going on? coming up next -- tackling stereotypes on the football field. >> we'll introduce you to a seventh grader who's a star quarterback and she is getting a lot of attention. stay with us. @p@p@p@p@p@p@p@p@pp
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village people. >> all right. when it comes to football, typically you think of guys on the field, girls on the sidelines. but that's what i said is typically what you think. >> that's right. one girl in louisville, kentucky, has sacked that stereotype. she's now the starting quarterback on her middle school team.
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whas's mike columbo reports. >> reporter: this isn't your typical team and this isn't your typical quarterback. this is hanna lee. >> the guys shut up and listen to her. she works hard just like anybody else. >> reporter: hanna, a 12-year-old seventh grader, says an announcement at school sparked her interest. >> they didn't say any boy who wanted to play. they just said any student. so, i'm a student and i was interested, so i just thought, why not? >> reporter: through spring and summer practices, hanna battled on when even her own family doubted her. >> we would give her outs. we would say, are you sure you want to stick with this? are you sure you want to do it? she would come out of practice sweaty and say, mom, i love it. >> reporter: now this quarterback will have her shot to make history. >> she's earned the right to start and lead our football program in this game saturday. >> down, set, go! >> reporter: her coaches believe
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hanna will be the first female to ever start at quarterback in jefferson county. >> these are all like my brothers and i don't want to let my family down. >> reporter: it's finally game day. >> go out there, have fun. let's beat this team. okay? >> all right? >> you ready to go? >> up the middle! >> got it. >> you know what to do. come on, babe! manage the team, manage the team. >> reporter: with her family in the stands, hanna takes her first official snap. >> as a mother, my first instinct is fear. so, i just want to make sure she's okay. >> reporter: after the stalled drive -- >> keep driving! >> hey, good job, hanna. good job. >> reporter: it's back to the drawing board. >> make sure you drop your butt. >> okay. >> all right. >> my heart doesn't slow down when i'm here. you know, it won't slow down probably until i get home with her safe and sound. >> reporter: another drive, another shot at redemption. >> that was a bad toss.
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>> let it come to you, okay? >> okay. >> you're all right. you're all right. get a drink of water. you're fine. >> reporter: much like life, there isn't always a fairytale ending. bumps, bruises, and the occasional turnover happen each day. >> getting the ball, you better be running full speed. >> reporter: for hanna, this experience is about more than touchdowns and triumph. it's about overcoming obstacles and proving that if there's a will, there's a way. >> regardless of what comes at you in the rest of your life, you will be able to take it on and you'll be successful 5, 10, 15 years down the road. >> my heisman. >> thinking about a career change.
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>> announcer: "world news now" delivers your "morning papers." >> yes, it's time for your "morning papers." here on this show we can't seem to stop talking about schweddy balls, as in the ice cream. schweddy balls. we've talked about this before.
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it's a new ben & jerry's flavor. we haven't tasted it. it sounds great. it's got fudge-covered rum balls. sounds delicious. however, a group called 1 million moms say it's tasteless. they want it off the shelves asking ben & jerry's to get rid of it. they're a conservative group. in the past, ben & jerry's has pushed the envelope before. they have a flavor called chubby hubby and a version for a while called hubby hubby celebrating gay marriages. they like to make their statements. i would like to taste it before i -- >> people get so worked up. it's an ice cream, you know. >> it is. next time we talk about it, we'll taste, it i promise. >> get some talcum powder and relax. this is this is how crazy the new york real estate market really is. a famous house in the west village. it is only 9 1/2 feet wide. think about that, not a lot of space. that's the width. and renting for $14,000 a month. it was purchased in 2010 for like $2.2 million. now they're asking $4.3 million
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for it. but it has been home to famous people including cary grant, jon barrymore. margaret meade. >> location, location, location in greenwich village. that tells you everything, right? >> i don't care whether -- that -- that narrow. whatever. that's new york for you. here's a very sad story. ukrainian man, 77 years old, wins a dumpling-eating contest. what he gets for this? he wins a jar of sour cream. after all this, he dies. so, investigators are looking into whether he died from the dumplings, from the sour cream or something else. 77 years old. geez, i mean -- >> that's a tough way to go. at least he was full. >> yeah. america's most caffeinated city. what do you think here, based on the number of starbucks in the city? from number five to number one. l.a. is fifth most. san francisco the fourth. seattle, naturally, the third. new york, which is one on every corner, starbucks, number two. >> we're not number one?
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>> we're not number one. but guess who is? the folks in windy city ranked the most caffeinated city in the country. >> i guarantee you, they are not more caffeinated than we are right now. >> nope, not on this shift. >> show them your cup, rob. >> our fancy mug. and a special anniversary to celebrate today. >> that's right. 125 years today the statue of liberty was given as a gift to america. there she is. beautiful. >> beautiful lady liberty looking good in these predawn hours on this thursday morning. >> happy birthday, lady liberty. >> that's right.cccccccccccccccc
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this morning on "world news now" -- controversial execution. the state of georgia executed convicted killer troy davis after dramatic last-minute supreme court considerations. >> despite outcries from attorneys and protesters, the execution was carried out four hours late in an unprecedented legal drama.
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it's thursday, september 22nd. >> announcer: from abc news, this is "world news now." good morning, everybody. i'm rob nelson. >> i'm tanya rivero. troy davis said he was innocent right up until the moment of his death, where he told family members of the police officer he was accused of killing he did not do it. these claims of innocence drew worldwide support. >> an amazing drama that unfolded yesterday. supposed to happen like 7:00 eastern, backed up, all the way up to the supreme court -- >> four hours it was stayed, the execution while the supreme court decided, nope, go ahead. >> 11:08 eastern time is when it happened. we'll have a lot on that. also this morning, advice for 1 in 4 american homeowners who are now considered under water. what can be done when you owe more money to your bank than your house is actually worth is this sadly, a common dilemma
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across the country these days. >> a painful place to be. a lot of folks in that position. later this half hour, controversy from a florida classroom where a sixth grade teacher told the class the truth about the tooth fairy. we've been asking you this morning on facebook, did this teacher cross the line? >> a lot of response on facebook. good debate here. >> tooth fairy, santa claus, how long do you keep the myths going? >> her point of view, sixth grade, they should have been told by now, but some parents said, wait a minute, teacher, you overstepped. >> that's my job. >> i'm bummed out on this thursday morning. >> are you sure about that? >> really? oh, man. before we get to that, serious news this morning. the state of georgia executed troy davis late last night. 22 years after the shooting death of an off-duty policeman for which he was convicted. >> as the hour of his death neared, davis lodged and lost one final appeal. abc's john hendren joins us with the details. hi, john. >> reporter: good morning, rob and tanya. it was a somber night for a man in georgia put to death despite lingering questions over his guilt.
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he's been on death row for two decades for a murder he says he did not commit. >> that is. >> that is. >> my name. >> my name. >> reporter: that wouldn't be unusual, except 7 of the 9 witnesses who helped convict him agree. all seven say he was not the man who gunned down off-duty police officer mark macphail. in 1989. six say police threatened them if they did not identify davis. supporters who note there was no physical evidence linking davis to the murder called for a last-minute reprieve. >> there's too much doubt for this execution to continue. >> reporter: those hopes dimmed tuesday when the georgia pardons and parole board rejected his clemency bid to the relief of macphail's family. >> we have put up with this stuff for 22 years, and it's time for justice today. >> reporter: macphail was shot to death while rushing to help a homeless man who had been attacked. >> they think i'm after blood. i'm not. i'm after justice. >> reporter: zaifs the latest in a series of executions that have
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drawn question. lawrence russell brewer, also executed for dragging a black man to his death behind his truck. then there was cleave foster in alabama and duane buck in texas, both spared execution in the past week when the supreme court stepped in. >> we just thank god for another chance. >> reporter: for davis, the campaign ran into the final hours. in atlanta -- >> we won't let troy davis die! >> stand up and testify! >> reporter: davis had a high profile list of supporters including big boi of the group outkast and quest love of the roots. also backing him, former president jimmy carter and the pope. >> if the pope's on your side, what else can be done? >> certainly opened a whole conversation, not just about this case in particular but the death penalty in general. it's certainly worth considering. >> absolutely. interesting point in all this, the widow of the officer killed in this case says -- she told reporters at least, this is not a time to rejoice but a time for all families involved in this
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case to heal. that's probably what this calls for. >> absolutely. a lot of people have been taking to twitter, commenting about this case. >> a lot of folks. the death penalty debate rages on in this country. >> absolutely. now to other news. the two americans released from an iranian prison enjoying their first full day of freedom. shane bauer and josh fattal rushed off the plane in oman into the arms of their joyful families. the moment came two years after their arrests for trespassing and espionage. fattal's fiancee, sarah shourd, who was released last october, was there to greet him. >> we are so happy we're free and so relieved we're free. our deepest gratitude goes towards his majesty sultan qaboos of oman for obtaining our release. >> two years in prison is too long. we sincerely hope for the freedom of other political prisoners and other unjustly imprisoned people in america and iran. >> oman is an ally of both the u.s. and iran and secured their release with $1 million bail. bauer and fattal could spend several days there before
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returning to the u.s. >> what a moment for those families, oh. back here in new york, palestinian leader mahmoud abbas could ask the u.n. to recognize the palestinian state as early as tomorrow. but in a speech to the u.n. yesterday, president obama argued that only direct negotiations with israel can achieve that end. the u.s. has promised to veto the palestinian bid, but that has not swayed the palestinians. >> this is morally, politically and legally correct what we are trying to do, joining the united nations. >> i think the palestinians want to achieve a state through the international community. but they're not prepared yet to give peace to israel. >> the united states and others are now working behind the scenes for some kind of middle ground in all of this, but they are not likely to head off the preliminary showdown set for tomorrow at the u.n. lady gaga is promising to keep up the fight against bullying as another gay teenager takes his own life. 14-year-old jamey rodemeyer was
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found dead of an apparent suicide outside his home in buffalo, new york. he had repeatedly written online about being bullied. lady gaga tweeted she's meeting with the president and says, bullying must become illegal. the national bullying prevention summit happens to be wrapping up in washington today. two members of the cincinnati bengals are in trouble this morning after a marijuana bust at their home. a package with more than two pounds of pot arrived at the home of jerome simpson and anthony collins yesterday. it was tracked all the way from a major producing area of california. the cops found six more pounds of marijuana in that house, along with everything needed to distribute it. no one was arrested but authorities are figuring out who will handle the prosecution. and the american dream is becoming more difficult to achieve as home values continue to slip. the typical american home is now worth almost a third less than it was five years ago and some homeowners are being told to cut their losses and just walk away. here's abc's jim avila.
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>> reporter: they think the best strategy is to buy, taking advantage of all-time low interest rates and bargain prices. >> the time is right. and the rates are great. >> reporter: could be, but to be a buyer and survive today, experts say you must be confident of your job status. put 20% down. and plan on staying in the house a long time. at least a decade. forcing a dramatic change in the american dream. >> the american dream is, let me just rent my house and get out of the house that i'm under water. please, help me. >> reporter: in fact, for the 12 million american homeowners, that's 1 in 4 who are under water, owing more on their mortgages than their houses are worth, experts recommend a startling solution. walk away. katie easley did just that. gave the keys to her three bedroom arizona house back to the bank. >> i cried a lot. i felt that i didn't have anywhere else to go. i didn't have anywhere else to turn. >> reporter: suze orman says her
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blueprint for katie and others underwater by 20% or more, is to ask the bank for a short sale, selling the house for market value, even if it is less than what is owed. if they won't, she says stop making payments and save that money until the bank forecloses. is it unethical to walk away? >> are you kidding me? of course you should walk away if the bank isn't willing to help you. >> reporter: this strategic default plan is used by banks, too. they call it commercial mortgage default. morgan stanley did it, walking away from its lender on six san francisco office buildings in 2009. it is not a painless solution, however. for the residential homeowner, there are walkaway ramifications. a credit score drop of 150 to 200 points and it will take at least five years to recover. in the meantime, will you find it difficult to buy and may need a big deposit to rent. >> it is certain that your credit is going to become much worse. borrowing is going to become much more expensive in the near term. >> reporter: americans under
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water say the banks aren't helping and neither are government programs. in fact, one government program has $30 billion to spend and has only allocated $7 billion. jim avila, abc news. new york. >> the american dream slipping away for so many people. >> a rough housing market. here is your thursday forecast. wet in much of the east. rain from the carolinas up to new england. scattered showers in florida. rainy around dallas, oklahoma city and little rock. windy with showers from seattle to olympia, washington. and fall-like in the midwest. >> 50s in fargo, minneapolis. 60 in the windy city. 77 here in new york. nice day up here. also some 80s in dallas, baltimore and miami. phoenix, still hot, 102. sacramento, meanwhile, 96. boise, 85. >> ah, thursday morning. >> yes. almost the end of the week. >> what a delicious time for, what else, a miraculous animal story. we knew you wanted one, rob. here's goldie, the dog, according to her owner never strays far from home. >> but goldie was gone for a week and no one knew where she
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was. turns out she had fallen into a six-foot sink hole right there on her owner's property. >> they did get her out and they say goldie made a bee line for the house, which she has hardly left since being rescued. we can't blame her for being home bound. >> so glad that goldie is home. >> aren't you relieved, rob? >> so relieved. i can sleep easy tonight. >> i can see it in your face. >> i'm glad they found their dog. stay out of the hole. >> we'll be back with more "world news now." ♪ just get back up get your 18-wheeler truck and i won't give up ♪ let me tell you about a very important phone call i made. when i got my medicare card, i realized i needed an aarp... medicare supplement nsurance card, too. medicare is one of the great things about turning 65,
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hello, everybody. we know people argue all the time about certain subjects that should or should not be taught in school. but less often do people argue about those childhood myths. >> easter bunny, santa claus, all these things out there.
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but now, a schoolteacher from florida is caught in the middle of a controversy for telling the truth. but should she have? here's sara miles. >> reporter: at 11 years old julie still sees a friend or two lose a tooth or two in class. >> it was wiggly and about to fall out. he said, i hope the tooth fairy comes. >> reporter: what she heard from her teacher was quite the surprise. >> my teacher's like, the tooth fairy isn't real. he said, what, is it like santa claus? and is their name mom and dad? >> reporter: mr. wells told us off camera he was trying to console the student and didn't realize what he said. but other kids in the classroom overheard. after school, julie went to her father. >> don't think he just made a mistake. he was being a mean-spirited person. >> reporter: he contacted the school and school district, hoping for an apology from wells. and the assurance that it would not happen again. the school district tells us, the teacher feels very badly about what has transpired and
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regrets that it has upset one of his students. >> teachers won't feel the need to take it upon themselves to discuss things that should clearly be handled at home. >> reporter: julie tells us she still believes in the tooth fairy and santa claus. it's her feelings toward her teacher that have changed. >> i think of him differently now, but that's, like, that's just my opinion. >> wait, so are you telling me the tooth fairy isn't real? >> i still believe in the tooth fairy. these days i'll take all the money i can get. >> i agree with that. devastating news. when is the last time you lost a teeth -- tooth, though, rob? >> a tough way to make some cash. >> this has gotten a lot of attention on our facebook page. a lot of folks have a lot to say. it does seem like an issue let parents deal with it. stick to math and reading and -- let the other stuff, you know -- >> all those childhood myths, let the parents figure that out for the kids. oh, rob. you look so cute. >> i'm not sure how i feel about that whatsoever. >> love the tutu. >> let's quickly go to break,
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shall we? >> love the tutu. >> quickly go to break. ow
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welcome back, everybody. everyone has been buzzing about "the real housewives" shows. some from infidelity to suicide to getting fired now. the popular franchise has been a hot topic as of late. >> one of the series' best known housewives is speaking out in an exclusive interview, jill zarin of the new york wives is talking about her firing and much more. here's abc's andrea canning. >> this is so conjured up, are you kidding me? >> reporter: during the last four seasons of "the real housewives of new york city" -- >> they were so mean. >> reporter: jill zarin reigned supreme, as the tart-tongued
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drama queen. >> you look like an alien invaded her body. >> bethenny, we are done. have a nice day. >> too much for me. >> reporter: then a shocking phone call. how did it feel when you got that call and they said, you're fired. >> it was a little jolting, i'll be honest. didn't feel good. nobody likes to not be asked back to the party. >> reporter: did they tell you why you and the other three ladies had to go? >> i didn't really ask. i felt like it didn't matter. they had made their decision. >> reporter: just a few weeks before season five was supposed to start filming, bravo decided to overhaul nearly the entire cast of the mega hit firing not only jill, but also alex, kelly, and cindy. it seems like a very toxic environment sometimes. >> it is a toxic environment. it is a toxic environment. you watch the show, it's toxic. it took me months to come down from it. >> reporter: the toxicity seems to have only grown in recent months. i want to get your take on the salahis. >> salacious salahis. >> reporter: the salahis from the canceled d.c. franchise made headlines after rumors of a kidnapping, an affair with a rock star, and divorce filings.
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>> i'm not surprised. clearly she's going for the bigger and better deal. >> reporter: all those melodramas can't compare to the tragedy faced by the housewives of beverly hills, who lost a cast member's husband to suicide. >> my heart broke for taylor and her family. >> reporter: what advice would you have for taylor if you could talk to her? >> honestly i wouldn't talk to the press or anyone for six months to a year. and i would buckle down with my family. and i probably wouldn't come back on the show. but -- if she needs the money, she's got to do what she's got to do to support her family. >> reporter: taylor armstrong spoke for the first time on "entertainment tonight" and made startling allegations. >> he would say to me, i'm afraid i'm going to kill you one day. >> reporter: why would it be a bad idea for her to come back on the show? >> it hasn't been good to her. i can't imagine watching her crying as much as she does, how much fun she's having.
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>> reporter: despite not being asked to the show, it appears zarin may be able to cash in on her 15 minutes of fame. she's now working on a jewelry line as well as squeeze shapewear. she says the payoff of reality tv stardom isn't the paycheck, it's the long-term branding opportunity. >> you don't get rich doing a reality show, so i have squeeze couture and i'm coming out with other product lines and the show is -- was my platform. so if i look at it that it was a free infomercial, so be it. >> i think that is the most honest and truthful attitude toward reality tv i have heard anyone own up to. >> she said you don't get rich. i thought they were already supposed to be rich. >> supposed to be. now they want more like all the lovely ladies at "world news now."
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♪ if i could read your mind love what a tale your thoughts could tell ♪ ♪ just like a paperback novel the kind the drugstores sell ♪ ♪ when you reach the part where
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the heart aches come ♪ ♪ the hero would be me >> welcome back, everybody. finally we've all looked for motivation at one time or another to lose weight. well, one illinois woman found the ultimate reason to shed some pounds. >> her brother needed a kidney. but doctors said she could only help if she were more healthy. so she knew exactly what she had to do. here's abc's barbara pinto. >> reporter: this was carrie roberts two years ago. and this is carrie today, 135 pounds lighter. >> they used to be tight on me. >> reporter: her diet plan? a combination of love and fear. her only brother tony was diagnosed with kidney failure in need of a transplant. the ideal donor, a sibling. >> the minute i found out he needed a kidney, i right away wanted to be tested. but he informed me that they even consider me the weight i was at. >> reporter: doctors said at 320 pounds, kari's body was prone
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to all kinds of problems. kidney disease, blood clots, diabetes, too many risks to her life to help save her brother. so kari began a race against time. adopting a strict low-fat diet. she started walking, then running. first a few blocks, then a few miles. in the moments when the distance to the finish line seemed too far, she turned to her greatest inspiration, watching her brother with his 2-year-old son jackson. >> i definitely want my brother to be healthy to be with his son and take his son fishing. >> reporter: in april, thanks to kari's miraculous transformation, she was thin enough to get tested. doctors say the real miracle came next in a phone call from the hospital. >> you're a match. not only are you a match, you're a perfect match. we were excited. >> we had a little cry together. i don't know how you thank someone for doing this for them, but i'll spend the rest of my life trying to. >> reporter: sometime in the next two weeks, kari will give her brother a kidney. >> everybody keeps telling me they think i'm great for saving him, but in reality i think
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we've saved each other. he's helped save me, too. >> reporter: an incredible gift from a little sister with an even bigger heart. barbara pinto, abc news, crestwood, illinois. >> that is so well said, we saved each other. that is so right on. >> absolutely. of course, brother and sister are keeping fingers crossed that the transplant takes. luckily, doctors say 98% of transplanted kidneys will be working a year after the first transplant. >> very cool. how she did it? she said she followed arlrlrlrl"
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this morning on "world news now" -- free at last. two american hikers jailed in one of the world's most notorious prisons are on their way home. >> josh fattal and shane bauer have left iran, and are now back in the arms of their love ones, after a two-year-long legal
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nightmare. it's thursday, september 22nd. >> announcer: from abc news, this is "world news now." good morning, everyone. i'm tanya rivero. >> and i'm rob nelson. the two men arrived in oman last night. what an emotional reunion. this remarkable scene played out. though iran's president is now preparing to address the united nations later today. >> that's right. very interesting to see what he has to say. >> oh, big political theater going on in new york today. >> but this release very, very exciting. >> the timing is good. two years, the guys have waited two years. unbelievable. >> the family is so happy. also this morning, the police officers in southern california who are now charged in the videotaped beating death of a mentally ill homeless man. we'll hear from the victim's father, who has demanded justice. a pretty scary video. >> disturbing story. and later this half hour, i have to admit, this story about a dog who got lost not once but twice and finally made it home to his rightful owners is pretty remarkable.
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it is our -- well, it's some people here's favorite story of the day. >> i was going to say, are you a changed man? have you seen the light? >> i'm not going to lie. no, no, no. >> all right. but first, shane bauer and josh fattal are enjoying their first full day of freedom. after two years in an iranian prison. >> good human story here. today they have the first steps toward putting their lives back together again. abc's diana alvear joins us with details of their long-awaited release. good morning to you, diana. >> reporter: rob and tanya, good morning. shane bauer and josh fattal are back with the families who fought so hard for two years to free them from prison. a stunning and emotional turn of events considering just a month ago their situation seemed hopeless. bounding down the stairs of the plane, americans shane bauer and josh fattal headed straight into the arms of their loved ones. free at last, after more than two brutal years in iran's prison. >> we're so happy we're free and relieved we're free.
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we're sincerely grateful to the government of oman for hosting us and our families. >> a wonderful day today. for them, and for us. >> reporter: so ended 26 months of legal and diplomatic struggles that started when iranian authorities claimed bauer, fattal and bauer's fiancee, sarah shourd, illegally crossed the border while hiking in iraq. they were arrested, jailed and accused of spying. last year shourd was released to her family. but bauer and fattal remained in prison. only last month they were convicted of spying and illegally entering iran and then sentenced to eight years in prison. last week iranian president mahmoud ahmadinejad said their release was imminent. >> translator: we act upon what we say. when we said we will release them, we will release them. as a humanitarian gesture. >> reporter: their sentences were commuted and $1 million bail was paid for by oman, the same nation that received the
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newly freed hikers, where their families were waiting to greet them. >> two years in prison is too long. we sincerely hope for the freedom of other political prisoners and other unjustly imprisoned people in america and iran. >> reporter: they are expected to remain in oman with their families for a few days to relax before flying home to the u.s. rob, tanya? >> what a joyous flight that will be for those guys. oh, unbelievable. >> and iranian president ahmadinejad is in new york today for the u.n. assembly. we'll see what he has to say later on. >> a big feather in his cap that these guys are on their way home now. that's exactly what he wanted. so it all worked out. even though some say the $1 million it took to get out of jail was more like a ransom than it was bail. criticism of how this was handled. bottom line, they're on their way back to america. >> happy day, indeed. in other news, in georgia late last night, troy davis lost a final appeal from the u.s. supreme court and was put to death by lethal injection. davis was convicted of killing an off-duty policeman 22 years
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ago. but the sentence sparked international protest and high-level supporters at home after witnesses recanted their testimony. davis went to his death saying he was innocent. georgia was not the only state to carry out a death sentence last night. texas executed lawrence brewer by lethal injection. he's the man who chained a black man to the back of his truck and dragged him to death back in 1998. brewer was a known white supremacist and a gang member. and this incident labeled as a notorious hate crime that made headlines around the country. one of his accomplices remains on death row and is now appealing his sentence. two police officers in fullerton, california, are disputing charges they are now facing. those charges stem from the beating and eventual death of a mentally ill homeless man over the summer. we get the details from kabc. >> reporter: the district attorney called the actions of officer manuel ramos reckless on the night of july 5th when he
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and five other officers tried to arrest kelly thomas, a 37-year-old mentally ill homeless man. >> ramos set in motion the events that led to the death of kelly thomas. >> reporter: the 37-year-old fullerton police officer charged with murder and involuntary manslaughter. 39-year-old corporal jay cicinelli also charged with involuntary manslaughter. >> cicinelli used excessive force when he assaulted and beat kelly thomas acting recklessly, under color of authority and without necessity. >> reporter: the beating happened two months ago near the bus depot in fullerton. officers received calls that someone was trying to break into cars. the d.a. alleges the encounter turned from a routine police detention to an impending beating that began with ramos as he leaned over thomas and made two fists. >> he lifted his fists to kelly thomas in front of his face so that he could see them. and he said, now, see my fists? they're getting ready to f you
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up. >> reporter: thomas' screams for his father can be heard on youtube video. the d.a. says a video camera owned by the city provided important evidence. the d.a. alleges it shows the officers delivering a number of blows to thomas' head. they also tased him four times. >> cicinelli used the front of the taser to hit kelly thomas in the face eight times, in the facial area. >> reporter: the cause of death, thomas was unable to breathe due to the force of the officers on his chest, head injuries also contributed. an emotional day for thomas' father as he listened to the d.a.'s findings. >> came in here expecting the worst and i got the best, really. so, very happy. >> reporter: this is eileen frere for abc news. >> disturbing story. in other news this morning, federal aviation officials are looking into the crash of a small plane near lake tahoe that came down in an aircraft parking area and then burst into flames just after leaving the ground.
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the pilot was the only person on board. he was brought to a hospital in reno, nevada, with serious injuries. luckily, though, he escaped the plane before it caught fire. the united states should be in the clear as that six-ton satellite races closer to earth. the old research satellite is expected to crash down some time tomorrow afternoon. nasa says it will not pass over north america. but it's too early to tell precisely when and where it will hit. the satellite is expected to break up with some two dozen pieces reaching earth. they could be scattered over a 500-mile area. the nationwide listeria outbreak linked to cantaloupes is now being blamed for killing at least eight people. health officials say now 55 people in 14 states have been sickened. one of the latest victims is a 48-year-old colorado woman who died a month after eating contaminated cantaloupe. at least two lawsuits now have been filed against jensen farms, the suspected source of the deadly bacteria. so, do you like the facebook changes you have no doubt seen
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by now -- >> no, no. >> -- on your home page? >> no. >> plenty of the site's 750 million users do not and they are letting the company know about it. more facebook changes are expected to be announced today at a conference in san francisco. all the new stuff caused such a stir yesterday, the words "new facebook" were one of the most discussed topics on twitter. so, what do you think? you're not a fan, right, rob? >> no. i'm not. i'm a facebook addict. i went on yesterday morning after the show and this whole thing had changed. and they do this bizarre cnn news feed thing and then top story and -- >> too distracting. too much going on. >> and how are you determining what i would think a top story would be? what's the math they do to calculate -- seemed unnecessary. like, why are you doing this? >> it's still huge business, though. it's expected to bring in nearly $4 billion in worldwide advertising this year. it's projected to bring in almost 6 billion bucks next year. they've got to be doing something right. >> i still believe some of the changes they do, particularly ones they don't announce, have
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to be linked to the huge marketability of the site and what it means for those dollars. that's what i think, too. that's just a theory. chime in on facebook. this has a lot of buzz. if you can find it. >> right. >> logon and let us know. wnnfans.com. i don't like it, man. too much -- i'm getting old. i don't like all this change. >> tone it down, keep it simpler, cleaner. >> there we go. please. here's your thursday forecast now. >> we're the experts. >> yes. a soaker for much of the east from maine down to new york, charlotte and atlanta. showers from little rock to dallas. possibly austin and waco. wet and windy in the pacific northwest from seattle to olympia, washington. >> 81 in portland. 77 in salt lake city. 84 in billings. dallas gets up to 81. kansas city, 71. detroit, 70. 70s in boston and new york. 80 in atlanta. near 90 in miami. well, pope benedict returns to his home country of germany today for a four-day visit. and they are making a unique, if
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a bit pricy, souvenir. >> check out the papal bears being turned out by one toymaker. of course, he's completely dressed in pope-like attire. >> only making just over 100 of them. the price tag, $315. >> bears. bears were also made when benedict became pope and for his first visit to germany as pope in 2006 and for his 80th birthday. i wonder if there's a significance to the bear? >> i don't quite get it. cute and papal bear. whatever makes you float, folks. >> we'll be back with more "world news now." ♪ your little teddy bear ♪ put a chain around my neck and leave me standing there ♪
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welcome back, everybody. we turn now to some medical news this morning. the critical connection between having cancer and dying of a heart attack. that's exactly what happened to kara kennedy, the daughter of late senator ted kennedy. >> so what can cancer survivors learn from her death? here's abc news medical editor dr. richard besser. >> reporter: kara kennedy, the picture of an active cancer survivor. 51 years old, mother of two, film maker and tv producer. she had been healthy for nine years after surviving surgery, chemotherapy and radiation for her lung cancer. then at her gym last week, as she did her regular exercise, her family said her heart gave out. perhaps because of the very cancer treatments that saved her. it's a growing concern for cancer survivors and their doctors who realize cancer isn't just a heartache, it may lead to a heart problem. beating back cancer cells with toxic chemicals and beams of raise united nations takes a
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toll on the healthy cells as well. when radiation is targeted at the breast or lung, especially on the left side of the body, the heart can be accidentally damaged. even more importantly, some chemotherapies can weaken the heart. such a concern it's given rise to a new field, cardioncology. cardiology that pays special attention to these at-risk cancer survivors. those doctors recommend a cardiac stress test or a heart ultrasound to check for damage, whether it's a week or 20 years after the cancer is beaten. >> we're encouraging our patients to continue to watch their diet, go for low fat, low carbohydrate, moderate protein diet and exercise. >> reporter: 51 is too young to die, but kara kennedy's death may be a wake-up call for others. as more survive cancer, doctors are working to make sure patients survive cancer treatments for longer than ever. on this relatively new frontier, there is good news. specialized equipment radiologists use to try to target the cancer and avoid the heart all together. drugs are monitored more closely to make sure they're not affecting the heart muscle.
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dr. richard besser, abc news, new york. >> what a scary link. she was diagnosed with lung cancer back in 2002 and was told it was inoperable. but then, with the help of ted kennedy, found a doctor to remove part of her lung in addition to the radiation and chemo. and she made it. >> she was laid to rest wednesday. the family is still in mourning. >> 51 years old. young, young. we will lighten the mood a little bit when we come back. stay tuned for your "skinny."
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♪ it's the end of the world as we know it ♪ ♪ it's the end of the world as we know it ♪ and i feel fine ♪ >> appropriate song, indeed. >> indeed. it is the end of the world as we know it. a lot of folks are going to shed a tear over this one. r.e.m. is splitting up, calling it quits. it's over. calling it a day. they each have something to say about it but i think one of the most appropriate statements was made by michael stipe, lead singer. he said a wise man once said the skill in attending a party is knowing when it's time to leave. >> well said.
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>> they said they built something extraordinary together. we did this thing and now we're going to walk away from it. i hope our fans realize this wasn't an easy decision. but all things must end and we wanted to do it our way. >> after 31 years. >> no animosity. they're done. over three decades released 15 albums. classics like "murmur,"" reckoning," "document out of time." they have plans to release a careers span and greatest hits collection later this year. look out for that. it will have new music on it as well. >> they did their thing. they were a huge success. now they wanted to do something different. they did a lot of good stuff. >> they had their time in the sun and they're going to take a little break. >> losing their religion. well, this is an interesting story here, abc has a new show coming out "charlie's angels" which one of the stars is minka kelly, who is best known probably right now, the ex-girlfriend of yankees star
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derek jeter. apparently there was a situation on the set where a crew member slapped her on the backside and she kind of yelled at him and said, please don't ever disrespect me or any other woman like that again. and because abc has a zero tolerance policy on sexual harassment the guy was banned from the set. he has been fired. she apparently was friendly with the guy and didn't want him fired. but, you know -- it was kind of out of her hands. >> she didn't complain. someone else saw the incident happening and reported it. >> apparently the kicker is the guy had done this before. i will tell the guy this, bad form, but great taste. >> oh, okay! all right, moving on from that. new allegations emerge surrounding lance armstrong and whether or not he used the juice. we have to say lance armstrong has never been tested positive and he denies any use but new reports coming out of an italian newspaper saying that he made payments to an italian physician who had been banned for doping through a company in switzerland. in other words, he used this company in switzerland as a front to make payments to this doctor who italian authorities say earlier this year they suspect him of continuing to
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work with 20 to 30 top-level cyclists despite the ban, this doctor was banned. again, you know, lance armstrong denies all of these allegations. but it's an interesting new report. >> tough to hear about such a great athlete. "modern family." huge fan of it. they're back again. the season three premier was last night. of course, you remember, the two adorable little girls who played lily, twins in real life, jade and ella hiller but apparently they didn't like acting, just wanted to be little girls so they replaced her with a new little girl who will have lines. an adorable little girl. >> look how cute she is. >> the new lily on "modern family."
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here are some stories to watch today on abc news. the protesters who have been expressing their anger with wall street since saturday say their demonstrations will continue today and indefinitely. police have arrested at least seven people during the demonstrations. president obama is spending
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part of the day in the key political state of ohio. he's promoting his jobs plan and visiting a bridge at the he says would be repaired if the gop backs his proposal. julian assange's long-awaited autobiography goes on sale today. but the wikileaks founder says he's not happy about it. it's the result of a strained relationship between assange and his publisher. >> hope the publisher didn't leak it. finally this half hour is our -- ready? nicely done today, guys. favorite story of the day. today's story involves two of my favorite things -- animals and my spiritual mecca, las vegas. one of my favorites. >> that's right. this is the story of a sin city family reunited with their missing dog after 11 years. ktnv's heather klein has the story. >> reporter: his name is duncan, an adorable corgi who's quite the escape artist.
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>> cried and cried. >> reporter: michelle and kip bought duncan for their two boys 11 years ago. he became their shadow and companion. >> one day he was gone. just disappeared. >> reporter: they searched in shelters and put up flyers, but never heard anything about his whereabouts until just a few days ago. >> i got a call from this lady from missouri. she says, i have your dog. i'm like, what dog? >> reporter: the lady had duncan. kipp explains that duncan ended up in a valley shelter, where he was adopted. >> she was an elderly lady and the dog ended up being her companion for about ten years. >> reporter: then she passed away and her daughter brought duncan to missouri, where he escaped her house. he was picked up by another rescue group that discovered duncan had a microchip all along. >> i never would have thought it. not in a million years. but, you know, life is strange.
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you never know what's going to happen. >> reporter: one big adventure for one little dog. he certainly seems happy in his new old home. >> all right. you may not realize this but some of those microchips are set to work for about 25 years. >> really? programmed that long? >> yes. and s thiw th eacp co registration nue number of the registry for particular brand of a chip and the hand-held scanner reads the radio frequency of thecp
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making news this morning, they are finally free. >> the two americans charged with spying and held in iran, now heading home. hugs and kisses with family, after two very long years. and collision course. we are tracking that satellite set to plummet to earth. new details this morning on

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